Changing gears for a winning culture

There is plenty of research out there that tells us that the 1900’s command and control approach to management just doesn’t work in the modern world where change is constant and people want answers and results now.

If we are going to get true employee engagement and high performance with today’s and future generations, we need to fundamentally change the management model to one based on leadership and values-based behaviours that deliver trust and inspiration rather than just process control and risk management which really only deliver compliance. This is what study after study tells us.

It means business leaders need to change gears and in doing so reimagine their business culture and language from:

  • human resources to human beings
  • risk control to trust
  • process control to relationship optimisation
  • management to leadership
  • tasks to behaviours
  • outputs to outcomes
  • compliance to engagement
  • command to inspiration
  • structure to flexibility
  • reactive to resilient

It is a big adjustment and it is easy to fall back into the traditional management norm that has been drummed into us for all those years.

That is why it is so important to have a clear vision about where you are going and clear values and behaviours that say how you are going to go about doing that and then holding everyone accountable for modelling those every day, most importantly yourself.

Be prepared to challenge and be challenged, listen to what your people have to say and learn from that. It is amazing what a difference it can make to performance, engagement, innovation and wellbeing.

Ready to change gears?

 

Ridgeline HR educating young people on workplace rights

This morning, we ran the first of our “Your Workplace Rights” briefings for secondary students and first up were Year 10 students at Melba College about to go out on work experience.

The briefing covered pay and conditions, National Employment Standards, Modern Awards and Enterprise Agreements and the roles of the Fair Work Commission and the Fair Work Ombudsman. The presentation included links to online information resources, tools and calculators that anyone can use to be better informed about their rights, entitlements and obligations.

This pro bono service has been launched for all Maroondah secondary schools as part of our contribution to improving community wellbeing in the City of Maroondah.

Improving people performance in 7 simple steps

Do you do performance appraisals in your business?

If so, how productive are they?

Here are some ideas on how you can improve the quality and outcomes of your performance and development conversations with your people.

  1. Define the purpose

Be clear about what you are trying to achieve.

You have made an investment in people and you want to get the optimal return on that investment, don’t you?

So the process should be about how you work with your people to improve their performance thereby improving business performance, shouldn’t it?

  1. Connect the dots

This is about “getting people doing what you need them doing in the way that you need it done all of the time”. Provide that alignment by “connecting the dots” for people and teams:

  • You have a business strategy (vision, values & plan) which sets out your goals and how you are going to achieve them – .the BUSINESS plan
  • You have teams which are established to execute specific elements of your business plan – the TEAM plan and
  • You have people who are engaged to execute specific elements of their team plan – the PERSONAL plan
  1. Keep it simple and practical

What you need is a simple process that is logical, easy to use and applied consistently in practice eg a basic Action Plan model for BUSINESS, TEAM & PERSONAL plans which set out:

  • WHAT is the goal? Ensure alignment between business, team and personal goals
  • HOW are we going to achieve it? Detail the activities and the learning required to achieve the goals.
  • WHO is going to do it? Make teams and people accountable for delivering the expected outcomes but also recognize supports they require.
  • WHEN is it going to be done by? Set realistic timeframes.
  1. Make the time

Just as you need to continuously monitor and review your business plan (because things change), so you need to ensure that your teams and your people are adapting to any changes required.

Have regular meetings at each level to review progress against the plan, confirm outcomes, identify areas for improvement and make any necessary adjustments. At the personal level these should be at least quarterly.

  1. Manage the time

How do you get the most out of the time together?

Start with being structured – allocate a specific period of time for the meeting and have a simple agenda which might be:

  1. Review progress against the plan
  2. Identify any changes that are required
  3. Congratulations on achieving outcomes
  4. Confirmation of areas for development and focus,
  5. Set next meeting date

And stick to the commitments – if your people are your greatest asset, why wouldn’t you!

  1. Have balanced and transparent conversations

People value constructive feedback which is balanced giving hem recognition for their achievements, clarification with improvement requirements and support with learning.

It is very important that you listen to what others have to say and give them constructive feedback including the reasons why you hold a particular view whether or not that accords with theirs.

Above all, there should be honesty and no unpleasant surprises.

  1. Change the language

Drop generic HR terms like “performance appraisal” which, over time, have too often been associated with ineffective practice and unwanted events.

Be innovative and think about words that resonate with your business goals and values integrating them into the process.

Get these 7 steps right and you’ll enjoy both the process and the results!

Will your termination pass the “3 tents test”?

Having been in the field of human resources management for over 30 years, there have been plenty of occasions where I have had to consider disciplinary action and termination of employment as remedies for misconduct.

In doing so, we need to consider fairness from a couple of angles:

  • Substantive fairness which requires that the action taken would not be harsh, unjust or unreasonable and
  • Procedural fairness which is about ensuring that due process has been followed and the principles of natural justice have been complied with

A process that I use to consider the substantive fairness of an action is to assess them against the “3 tents” namely:

  • Content: what actually happened, ensuring that you are aware of the facts of events that have given rise to consideration of action?
  • Intent: was the action or dereliction of duty or other offence deliberate or was it due to a misunderstanding or a heat of the moment thing and is it in or out of character for the individual concerned?
  • Extent: what was the effect of the action or dereliction of duty or other offence on the business and/or employees and/or other parties?

Of course there are the procedural elements to attend to as well but ensuring that the action that you propose will stand up to the “3 tents test” is a good start.

7 steps to effective policies

One of the most common requests we get at Ridgeline HR is for assistance in developing HRM policies and procedures for our clients.

Many businesses think that simply having a policy is enough to demonstrate compliance but there is actually a lot more to it than that as businesses too often find out the hard way.

It is not much good having a policy if it is not practised in fact and the fact is that, if a business doesn’t follow it’s own policies, it automatically has a compliance problem.

And there is quite a bit of work involved in ensuring that policies are both appropriate and managed in the right way to achieve their objectives.

There are 7 steps to effectively implementing policies:

  1. Be clear about why the policy is necessary(and, if it isn’t, don’t do it).
  2. Ensure that the policy aligns in content and presentation with your vision, values and strategy (don’t create contradictions).
  3. Communicate the policy appropriately to everyone to whom it has application (on launch and progressively through inductions, refreshers etc as necessary).
  4. Train people who have roles to play in application of the policy in how to perform those roles in the right way.
  5. Assess risks (eg people who might have potential to breach the policy or need additional support to comply with it) and implement appropriate risk management strategies.
  6. Consult people and review practice regarding the policy to ensure that it is working as intended.
  7. Review the policy annually to take account of any legislative or best practice developments as well as organisational experiences to continuously improve it and ensure ongoing compliance – return to Step 1.

Perhaps the thing that I find most remarkable about most organisations which focus on risk management is that they don’t actually assess risks that exist in their organisations when they implement a policy. See Step 5 above.

There is too often a mentality that, if the rules are communicated and an individual then doesn’t follow those rules, the risk is transferred from the business to that individual.

For organisations that might be in that space, I suggest that you consider why the policy is needed in the first place – ie what purpose (other than complying with a legal obligation) does it serve in the management of people?

Or, to put it another way, why did it become a legal obligation in the first place?

Do your policies exist for policies’ sake or do they have a positive impact on your people and culture?

Engage through the CORE

Why is it that some businesses have people who stay with them and consistently perform well?

How do they keep them motivated?

Here are a few essential elements at the CORE of successful employment relationships:

Clarity

To get the right results, you need to be clear about:

  1. The plan – business goals and values provide the foundation for alignment of people with business needs
  2. Competencies – the skills and behaviours which drive your recruitment, selection and training activities
  3. Roles – the tasks that people are to perform and the results that are expected
  4. Resources – the systems, tools, information and relationships needed to succeed
  5. Communication – ongoing and open dialogue to ensure continuing alignment of people with business needs.

Opportunity

People want to do a good job and generally welcome opportunities to:

  1. Be involved – to be asked for their opinion and to have the opportunity to make a contribution
  2. Grow – to develop skills and experience new opportunities for expanding and applying their knowledge and expertise
  3. Comply – to understand what is expected of them in results and behaviour and do it and
  4. Succeed – to deliver the results expected

Recognition

Recognition of people’s value to the business is critical for ongoing motivation and delivery of results as well as in meeting legal obligations in managing people. These include:

  1. Remuneration and benefits – ensuring that people receive pay, benefits and conditions of employment appropriate to the role that they perform, the contribution that they make and its worth in the marketplace and having regard to obligations under legislation and awards.
  2. Ongoing feedback – investing the time to have regular reviews against personal goals, recognition of achievements and areas for improvement
  3. Rewards – personal incentives (ensuring that statutory obligations re minimum rates and conditions are still met) or other forms (public recognition, gifts or gift vouchers, development opportunities, etc)
  4. Correction – despite best efforts, sometimes a relationship doesn’t work and underperformance needs to be addressed promptly, sensitively and legally.

Equilibrium

People like equilibrium – a sense of balance and assurance in:

  1. Life – balancing our family and personal needs and our working life is as a key driver in attracting and retaining good people
  2. Respect -mutual respect between the employer and the employee and the capacity for open and honest communication
  3. Team – people want to belong and to have a sense of being part of a collective in which they are respected for who they are and what they contribute
  4. Security – the knowledge that the business is successful, my job is safe and I will be able to provide for my needs and those of my family.
  5. Sustainability – people’s confidence in the business commitment to continuous improvement and good corporate citizenship.

Focus on these core elements and you will optimize your prospect of having motivated people in your business and a great return on your investment in people.