Portable long service leave coming on 1 July 2019

The Victorian “Long Service Benefits Portability Act 2018” comes into effect from 1 July 2019.

From that date, workers in the community services, contract cleaning and security industries will be entitled to portable long service leave for all service in the industry regardless of how many employers they might have or for how long they work for an individual employer in the industry. This is funded by an Employer Levy to apply to the Portable Long Service Benefits Scheme as follows:

  • 1.65% for community services
  • 1.80% for contract cleaning
  • 1.80% for security

Employers in these industries are required to register with the Portable Long Service Benefits Authority within 3 months (ie by 30 September 2019).

Each quarter, January, April, July and October, registered businesses are required to lodge a quarterly return to the Portable Long Service Authority.

The quarterly return will include information about:

  • all workers who have worked for the business during that quarter
  • the ordinary hours they have worked
  • the pay they received during the quarter

The first quarterly return will require businesses to register all workers for the first time.

When a quarterly return is lodged, the levy must be paid at the same time.

The levy is calculated based on the worker’s ordinary pay.

Further information for employers on registration, returns and levy payments can be accessed here.

Existing employees who transition to the portable scheme will preserve their existing eligible service and entitlements. In these circumstances, an employer will be able to obtain a refund of levies paid in respect of that worker relative to that period of eligible service that comes after transition.

Information obtained in part from https://www.vic.gov.au .

FWC awards 3% wage increase

Today, the Fair Work Commission handed down the Annual Wage Review 2018-2019 decision.

That is to increase the national minimum wage and award wages by 3% effective from 1 July 2019.

The new National Minimum Wage will be $740.80 per week, or $19.49 per hour.

The increase is fully absorbable against overaward payments ie if you are paying employees base rates of more than 3% above award and you are also paying other entitlements under the relevant award and National Employment Standards, you can fully absorb the increase.

If you have an enterprise agreement or contract of employment that stipulates that wages will be adjusted in line with annual wage review or variations in award rates, you will need to pass these increases on.

If you are paying award-covered employees on an annualised salary basis or on an overaward payment that is intended to set off any monetary award provisions, you should review the arrangement to ensure that it remains above award once the new rates take effect.

Anyone requiring assistance in dealing with the issue is welcome to contact us for support.

Fresh thinking for old challenges

Fresh thinking for old challenges

We recently launched our new Better Workplace Projects and we are getting terrific feedback on the impact like:

“The session was excellent – great buy in from everyone and really positive feedback afterwards.”

“The team and I loved the session and felt very positive and inspired”.

Why are they having this impact?

It’s fresh thinking for old challenges!

We look at what drives people engagement and high performance through a positive psychology lens where the focus is on how we use our strengths to improve rather than just how we fix the problems.

We also reinvent the performance management process to provide a positive and continuous development experience that gets people engaged, aligned and accountable.

In our interactive Better Workplace Project Introductory Workshops, we introduce you to the best practice models that underpin the methodology and have an open conversation with you about how these might be used to address the people and culture challenges and opportunities and deliver high performance in your organisation.

For a small investment of $800 plus GST and a couple of hours of your time, we can help you to get started or step up on that journey to a Better Workplace.

Our Better Workplace Project Introductory Workshops are delivered by our Practice Leader, Peter Maguire, who has consulted to hundreds of organisations on people and culture strategy and practice. Peter has an extraordinary breadth of experience with clients in public, private and NFP sectors and in a wide range of industry and people culture settings. He is also a former Investors in People Assessor and has presented internationally on HRM best practices.

Dealing with family and domestic violence

Dealing with family and domestic violence

Over the past few months, there has been a succession of changes in provisions of modern awards and the Fair Work Act relative to family and domestic violence. In this article, our aim is to provide you with a sense of how they come together and what that means in terms of your legal obligations and how to manage those.

Early this year, the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare (AIHW) released a report “Family, domestic and sexual violence in Australia 2018” which told us that:

 

Family and domestic violence is the most significant social and welfare issue that we have in Australia and we can all do something about that.

Introduction of “Leave to deal with family and domestic violence” in modern awards 

The significance of this issue is such that the Fair Work Commission deemed it necessary to insert “Leave to deal with family and domestic violence” provisions in all modern awards. In essence, this provides an entitlement of up to 5 days of unpaid leave per annum for employees regardless of their employment status ie whether they are full-time, part-time or casual, they are entitled to the full 5 days each year.

An employee may take unpaid leave to deal with family and domestic violence if the employee:

(a) is experiencing family and domestic violence; and

(b) needs to do something to deal with the impact of the family and domestic violence and it is impractical for the employee to do that thing outside their ordinary hours of work.

That leave entitlement for award-covered employees came into effect on 1 August 2018.

Extension of entitlement to non-award employees

On 12 December 2018, the Fair Work Amendment (Family and Domestic Violence Leave) Act 2018 took effect and essentially extended the modern award entitlement effective from that date.

So effectively that means that all employees now have access to this entitlement as follows:

 Entitlement to unpaid leave

An employee is entitled to 5 days’ unpaid leave to deal with family and domestic violence, as follows:

(a) the leave is available in full at the start of each 12 month period of the employee’s employment; and

(b) the leave does not accumulate from year to year; and

(c) is available in full to part-time and casual employees.

So our take on that in implementation is:
  1. For existing award-covered employees and those who are subject to an agreement that incorporates the award, the entitlement takes effect from 1 August 2018
  2. For award-covered employees and those who are subject to an agreement that incorporates the award and who commenced employment after 1 August 2018, the entitlement takes effect from their date of commencement.
  3. For existing non-award employees and those who are subject to an enterprise agreement that doesn’t incorporate an award, the entitlement takes effect from 1 December 2018.
  4. For  non-award employees and those who are subject to an enterprise agreement that doesn’t incorporate an award and who commenced employment after 1 December 2018, the entitlement takes effect from  their date of commencement.
  5. All employee have the entitlement to 5 days per annum regardless of their employment status ie whether full-time, part-time or casual.

Interaction with new rules on Flexible Working Arrangements

We recently reported on these new rules.

New rules on flexible working arrangements are here

Two of the categories of workers who have entitlements under these rules are:

  • employees experiencing family or domestic violence; and
  • employees caring for family members experiencing family or domestic violence.

Accordingly, we can expect that eligible employees like these might well seek both leave to deal with family and domestic violence and flexible working arrangements. Alternatively, because the leave is unpaid, people might be more likely to seek flexibility in working arrangements that allow them to maintain their income while varying their hours of work to meet their personal or family needs.

If these matters cannot be resolved at workplace level, they may well end up in the Fair Work Commission via the disputes resolution clause in a modern award or enterprise agreement.

Additionally, while these rules on flexible working arrangements technically apply only to award covered employees, it should be expected that they would be regarded as a procedural and fairness benchmark for dealing with requests from non-award employees.

Care should be taken to ensure that any workplace policies on any of the above are reviewed to reflect current minimum standards and benchmarks.

We will publish an article soon on what employers can do to genuinely and positively influence the incidence and impact of family and domestic violence and why you should be doing that. Stay tuned!

$1 million in wage underpayments in horticulture

The Fair Work Ombudsman has just released a report into investigations that it has been conducting into workplace relations compliance in the “Harvest Trail” or horticulture industry. The particulars are:

  • 836 investigations, involving 444 growers and 194 labour hire contractors across all states in Australia and the Northern Territory.
  • $1,022,698 in underpaid wages and entitlements was recovered for 2,503 employees
  • More than 50% of the businesses investigated were found to have breached workplace laws
  • 150 formal cautions to employers were issued along with 132 infringement notices and 13 compliance notices and 7 Enforceable Undertakings were entered into.
  • 8 employers have been prosecuted for serious alleged breaches with four actions involving labour hire contractors. Of these, 6 matters have now been finalised resulting in over $500,000 in penalties.
  • 70% of employers employed people working in  Australia on visas.

One of the questions that the Fair Work Ombudsman is now considering is that of the effect of consumer buying behaviour on compliance levels in the industry. Further research and consultation with stakeholders is planned on this subject.

This is another area where the procurement behaviour and practices of major retailers of fresh produce must come under review if such initiatives are to have any meaningful impact on producer compliance and fair payment of horticultural workers.

FWC increases casual penalty rates in retail award

The Fair Work Commission has varied the penalty rates payable to casual employees in the retail industry for work performed on Saturdays and after 6.00 pm on weekdays.

The variations are being introduced in phases with the first increases taking effect from 1 November 2018.

The increases for weekdays after 6.00 pm are:

(i) From 1 November 2018 to 30 September 2019

A penalty payment of an additional 30% loading will apply for ordinary hours worked by a casual employee after 6.00 pm (inclusive of the casual loading).

(ii) From 1 October 2019 to 29 February 2020

A penalty payment of an additional 35% loading will apply for ordinary hours worked by a casual employee after 6.00 pm (inclusive of the casual loading).

(iii) From 1 March 2020 to 30 September 2020

A penalty payment of an additional 40% loading will apply for ordinary hours worked by a casual employee after 6.00 pm (inclusive of the casual loading).

(iv) From 1 October 2020 to 28 February 2021

A penalty payment of an additional 45% loading will apply for ordinary hours worked by a casual employee after 6.00 pm (inclusive of the casual loading).

(v) From 1 March 2021

A penalty payment of an additional 50% loading will apply for ordinary hours worked by a casual employee after 6.00 pm (inclusive of the casual loading).

The increases for Saturdays are:

(i) From 1 November 2018 to 30 September 2019

A penalty payment of an additional 40% loading will apply for ordinary hours worked by a casual employee on a Saturday (inclusive of the casual loading).

(ii) From 1 October 2019 to 29 February 2020

A penalty payment of an additional 45% loading will apply for ordinary hours worked by a casual employee on a Saturday (inclusive of the casual loading).

(iii) From 1 March 2020

A penalty payment of an additional 50% loading will apply for ordinary hours worked by a casual employee on a Saturday (inclusive of the casual loading).

For further information, go to the General Retail Industry Award 2010 and see Clause 29.4 Penalty Payments.

Or, if you need a hand, give us a call on 0438 533 311.