Are you ready for casual conversion?

All modern awards which do not already have a casual conversion clause will have one from 1 October 2018.

This means that employees who are engaged as casuals on a regular and systematic basis for 12 months can apply to convert to full-time and part-time employment.

An employer can refuse such a request on reasonable business grounds but these grounds are quite limited. In essence, if the employee would continue in employment beyond 12 months on much the same basis as a casual without any expectation of that arrangement changing, it would be difficult to reasonably decline a request for conversion.

This is a particular challenge for labour hire firms who typically engage most of their hired out workforce as casuals.

That challenge has been heightened in the minds of many by a recent decision of the Full Bench of the Federal Court  in the case Workpac v Skene. In that case, the Court decided that a labour hire casual who worked regular and predictable hours was a permanent employee at law, and was therefore entitled to paid annual leave, and other permanent employment rights.

This was a fly in fly out worker who was engaged on successive rosters for 6 months, 12 months and 12 months on regular and systematic hours. That really isn’t characteristic of a real casual employment relationship and that is what the court found.

In another case in South Australia (Apostolides v Mantina Earthmovers & Constructions Pty Ltd) earlier this year, the employee who had been engaged as a casual for 15 years but worked full-time over that period was also found to be a permanent employee and was awarded annual leave for the entire period of employment.

Our advice to businesses is that, rather than trying to avoid the issue, be proactive about it and here are some tips:

  1. Be realistic about the nature of the engagement – if it is going to be a regular and systematic arrangement where the employee works the same hours week in and week out ongoing, it isn’t really casual employment.
  2. Don’t be frightened by the myth that you want to keep employees as casuals to avoid unfair dismissal. The truth is it doesn’t matter whether an employee is engaged on a permanent or casual basis as they can both claim unfair dismissal if engaged for 12 months for businesses with less than 15 employees or 6 months for businesses with 15 or more employees.
  3. Have written employment contracts for all employees and ensure that they clearly state the nature of the engagement. Also ensure that you comply with any award provisions that stipulate information to be provided to casual employees on engagement.
  4. Have a system for dealing with the casual conversion election process and lead it to get each casual employee to make the decision, clearly spelling out what the differences would be if the employee converts to full-time/part-time employment or elects to remain casual. Many will decide to stay casual to get the 25 % casual loading.

Casual employees must be given a copy of the new clause within the first 12 months of their employment, or if already engaged, by 1 January 2019.

At Ridgeline HR, we have put quite a bit of thought into ways in which we can help labour hire businesses and any others with significant levels of casual employment to minimise the risks and treat their workforces ethically by ensuring they are informed about their rights and giving them fair choices.

Contact us using the form below if you would like us to discuss ways in which we might be of assistance with this issue.