Special event – An evening with Libby Gorr

When: 6.30 pm for 7.00 pm, Tuesday 17 July 2018

Where: Karralyka Centre, Mines Road, Ringwood East

Cost: $85 per head or $800 for a table of 10

Two course dinner plus drinks at bar prices 

Bookings at: www.footmen.org.au 

This is a family event full of fun and inspiration delivered by a trio of wonderful women.

Libbi Gorr is one of Australia’s finest live hosts and broadcasters. Warm, witty and smart, she has an exceptional ability to entertain, inspire, challenge and motivate, bringing a unique blend of journalism and humorous observation to all her work.

Sandi Givens is MC for the event, as we know her warm and genuine nature is evident in all her work as an MC, Conference Speaker and Workshop Facilitator.

You will also hear about the inspiring journey that Mel Spencer has undertaken with “Different Journeys”. This is a charitable endeavour to socially support young people on the autism spectrum and it is making a real difference.

Note: The Footmen Foundation is Ridgeline HR’s designated charity.

Significant non-compliance in local government security supply chain

The Fair Work Ombudsman has reported on an Australia-wide audit of the security service supply chains of 23 local councils with key findings as follows:

  • non-compliance with workplace laws in the supply chains of 14 (61 per cent) of the 23 councils, with breaches primarily relating to underpayment of minimum award rates as well as under- or non-payment of applicable penalty rates and overtime;
  • 63 per cent of subcontractors were found to be non-compliant compared to 42 per cent of principal contractors, who had a direct relationship with the council.
  • the Fair Work Ombudsman issued 26 formal cautions, 15 compliance notices and four infringement notices to non-compliant contractors and subcontractors.
  • A total of $72,250 was recovered for underpaid workers.

The full media release can be accessed here.

The Fair Work Ombudsman, Ms Natalie James also stated:

“While it is the primary responsibility of the employer to ensure compliance with workplace laws, it is clear that councils could – and should – be doing more to keep tabs on what is going on in their security contracting networks.”

“We’re recommending that local councils amend their security services tender documents to reflect best practice on contracting labour and ensure that the amounts paid in their contracts are sufficient for contractors and subcontractors to cover employee entitlements.

“We also expect that councils are proactive in monitoring their security supply chains, including by requiring contractors to regularly report on their compliance with their workplace obligations.

“Beyond such measures being in line with community expectations, councils should note that it is not just employers who can be held liable for breaches such as underpayments occurring in a supply chain – in certain circumstances councils themselves may be held legally responsible when their contractors or subcontractors are not complying with the law.”

With penalties of up to $630,000 per offence for a corporation and up to $126,000 per offence for an individual, there are also strong commercial grounds for local councils and their officers to follow the Fair Work Ombudsman’s advice.

Ridgeline HR provides tailored, thorough and affordable workplace relations compliance and audit programs for franchise groups and supply chains. 

“Ridgeline HR has  recently completed a very thorough confidential assessment within our wider franchise network to check understanding of workplace laws and minimum standards.    This has also involved the provision of a comprehensive compliance kit.   Peter Maguire (Practice Leader) has a very thorough knowledge of workplace relations within Australia, provides an excellent service and brings a very practical approach.   I would warmly recommend them.”

Leida Meijers, HR Director, Europcar

Ditch the bus and get a boat

One of the most repeated lines about developing high performing teams is the often misquoted Jim Collins line about “getting the right people on the bus”.

I attended a workshop the other day where this line was used and then one of the participants in the workshop told a story that said so much more about teamwork and high performance than the bus analogy ever could.

So what’s wrong with “the bus”? Whenever I hear this, the image I see is one of one person in charge (the driver) and everyone else just sitting there doing nothing other than being there. To me, it arguably depicts presenteeism (being there but not productively).

The counterpoint in this workshop was a story of a rowing crew where they were all in tune on the team strategy. They were all aligned with what tactics they would deploy in different scenarios that might arise in the race and they trusted each other to do their bit as and when the particular scenario presented.

An approach that I prefer is to replace the bus with a rowing rig where everyone has to stroke in time and the cox (ie our business leader) is calling out the stroke keeping people informed on what is required at each stage of the race. Everyone is making a contribution here.

So, do yourself a favour – ditch the bus and get a boat if you want to give your people the right picture about what good leadership and teamwork looks like.

 

Is good financial advice better for morale than a pay rise?

Smart employers understand that anything that they are able to do affordably to help their employees handle all of the pressures which go with living in a modern world has spin off benefits in employee wellbeing and productivity. One of those significant pressures is financial insecurity.

This article provided courtesy of our friends at FMD Financial tells us why and what you can do about it. 

Research shows 46% of employees worry about their finances and that worry can stop them achieving at work and feeling positive about their job. It’s a statistic that is motivating employers to take action. Improving financial wellbeing among staff was the top employer initiative for just 30% of companies in 2014. That figure has now jumped to 56% according to AON Hewitt’s 2016 Hot Topics in Retirement and Financial Wellbeing research.

Companies like RAA in South Australia are leading the charge. Senior Manager, Pay and Benefits, Tatjana Bergen, says providing employees with access to qualified financial advisers who build an ongoing relationship with the organisation and its employees is an important part of their commitment to supporting the financial wellbeing of staff. “FMD adviser, Dan Arcadiou, is regularly on site to meet with employees and FMD have developed a dedicated online survey our staff can access via the Intranet to get a better understanding of their financial situation at any time.”

It seems there is both a bottom line benefit and a moral imperative to boost financial wellbeing among employees. Eighty-five per cent of Australian employers say they’re focused on financial wellbeing because it’s the right thing to do, but almost as many (80%) are motivated by the desire to improve employee engagement.  Yet barriers to seeking financial advice remain. Employers may not know a good financial adviser or how to evaluate one. And recent scandals among big bank advisers have understandably put many business and HR leaders off taking that first step.  Experts agree people need to be empowered to take control of their financial wellbeing just as they do with maintaining a healthy lifestyle through a good diet and exercise. Fitness programs, fruit boxes and gym passes have long been a part of Australian workplaces, so why not high quality financial advice tools and qualified financial advisers?

As professional work continues to become more flexible but also more uncertain, good financial planning is becoming crucial to the growing contract workforce. Contingent workforce specialists Entity Solutionshave partnered with FMD to offer their workforce access to quality advice to help them plan for the future. CEO Neil Merola says “It’s key to ensure every independent professional has the opportunity to protect their lifestyle and where possible, maximise their income.”  With evidence suggesting many professionals are unprepared for maintaining their lifestyle in an uncertain job market, now is the  time to help employees take greater control of thier financial futures.

Talk to us about running an advice clinic at your workplace to give employees access to a reputable financial health check. Or if you have questions about your financial wellbeing, complete our quick and easy online financial health checkor book a free 1 hour consultationwith a qualified adviser.

Check them out at https://www.fmd.com.au

 

Fair Work Commission awards 3.5% wage increase

The Fair Work Commission (FWC) has handed down its decision on the 2017/18 Annual Wage Review, increasing the National Minimum Wage and award rates by 3.5% with effect from 1 July 2018.

This is about half what the ACTU claimed and twice what AiG offered so it was pretty well what we expected to be the outcome.

In last year’s decision, the FWC flagged the likelihood of a significant increase this year because of the fact that the lowest paid workers on award rates were still at risk of poverty. That is one of the reasons why the ACTU continues to press for a “living wage” which would be significantly higher than the National Minimum Wage and will remain on the ACTU agenda for some time to come.

The FWC has some empathy for the ACTU’s position in this regard but has to balance that with the ability of employers to manage a larger wage increase than that which it has awarded in each of the last two Annual Wage Reviews (3.3% and 3.5% respectively). We don’t expect that trend to change much in the foreseeable future.

The new national minimum wage for an adult employee will be $719.20 per week or $18.93 per hour from 1 July 2018.

The FWC will now embark on variations to award rates and allowances, all of which should be updated on their website (www.fwc.gov.au) over the next few weeks.

Employers need to apply this decision in one of the following ways:

  1. If the employee is covered by an award or an enterprise agreement and is being paid at award rates, increase the employee’s wage to the new award rate (ie by 3.5%);
  2. If the employee is covered by an award or an enterprise agreement and is being paid at above award rates, the employer can absorb the increase in award rates against that over award payment unless there is an enterprise agreement or contract of employment which provides for increases in wages in line with Annual Wage Reviews (in which case, wages would be increased by 3.5%);
  3. If the employee is paid on a salaried basis (whether expressed weekly, fortnightly, monthly, annually or otherwise), review the salary to ensure that it remains above award, having regard to all of the monetary benefits payable under the relevant award in respect of all hours worked under the contract of employment;
  4. If the employee is not covered by an award or enterprise agreement and is therefore subject to the national minimum wage, ensure that the employee’s remuneration provides at least that national minimum wage for all hours worked regardless of how it is structured.

Failure to provide employees with compliant levels of remuneration can result in severe penalties of up to $630,000 per offence for a corporation and $126,000 per offence for an individual. Claims for underpayment can be made retrospectively for up to 6 years.

If you need assistance with understanding what this decision means for your business, contact us using the form below for a free first consultation from us.